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You can't make this up. (Infinium Find )
Posted by: Dancer
Date: January 12, 2020 05:17AM
While finishing up a hunt decided to slip into a small hole, poke around a little. Couple of tabs, couple nickels, then a good signal where the Surf breaks.
Two scoops pulled out a large coin stained black. I thought naw, can't be. Well it was and after a few days soaking in salt & white vinegar. A beautiful 1922 Silver Peace Dollar. Great condition. This was off a heavily sanded in beach, which hardly ever produces. Couldn't believe the lack of dings and wear marks, yet heavily stained.




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Re: You can't make this up. (Infinium Find )
Posted by: earthlypotluck
Date: January 12, 2020 06:02AM
:surprised: Amazing find Dancer!!



Fear is paralyzing and courage is liberating. No matter what is put in front of you, there is always a way to make it work.

Dreams are just dreams, goals are dreams with deadlines. The desire to succeed comes from within. Stay focused on your goals, and if people say that you can’t do something, get them out of your life and move on.

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Never put silver in a salt/vinegar solution.
Posted by: vlad
Date: January 12, 2020 09:52AM
That works fine for nickles and clad, but generally you just try to restore the shiny appearance, in most cases to use in everyday commerce.
Both those chemicals are corrosive, and together even more so. Salt blackens silver, and even adds greenish deposits (the same as chlorine will.)
Try electrolysis; even hard deposits will often fall off (use baking soda as the electrolyte, and rinse after.)
The harshest chemical I ever use on silver is Jewel Luster; I dip it and then rinse it a few seconds later.

Re: Never put silver in a salt/vinegar solution.
Posted by: Dancer
Date: January 12, 2020 12:25PM
Quote
vlad
That works fine for nickles and clad, but generally you just try to restore the shiny appearance, in most cases to use in everyday commerce.
Both those chemicals are corrosive, and together even more so. Salt blackens silver, and even adds greenish deposits (the same as chlorine will.)
Try electrolysis; even hard deposits will often fall off (use baking soda as the electrolyte, and rinse after.)
The harshest chemical I ever use on silver is Jewel Luster; I dip it and then rinse it a few seconds later.

Vlad, Got any idea how long it it might've took to turn it black. Probably too many variables, huh.

Re: You can't make this up. (Infinium Find )
Posted by: tvr
Date: January 12, 2020 02:27PM
Good save on the big silver.

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One thing that causes it to blacken is sulfur (hydrogen sulfide in the air)
Posted by: vlad
Date: January 13, 2020 04:38AM
Being in dirt or water, which contains plant matter can speed it up.
Silver oxidizes faster in places with a lot of light and humidity. But it can turn other colors too (like a rainbow.) Often chemicals in paper (coin sleeves) can cause this and
also sunlight. Contact with products like cosmetics, perfume, deodorant, lotion, bleach or soaps can speed up the process.
The natural oils that your skin produces is affected by foods you eat, liquids consumption, meds and tobacco. They make your skin acidic
and we also naturally produce ammonia.

(some collectors will pay a premium for toned coins)


Re: One thing that causes it to blacken is sulfur (hydrogen sulfide in the air)
Posted by: maxxkatt
Date: January 17, 2020 08:21PM
his is absolutely correct. I collect Morgans. Morgans were produced in huge numbers for political reasons. To keep the western politicians happy by keeping the silver prices artificially high by the government buying and minting more silver morgans than was needed. They were then stored at the mint and then at all the post offices because there was no demand for them. The sulfer in the bags caused the rainbow effect on morgans stored in contact with the sides of the bags.

The morgans are such beautiful coins because of toning and the fact that a huge number never got circulated.

Re: One thing that causes it to blacken is sulfur (hydrogen sulfide in the air)
Posted by: Dancer
Date: January 18, 2020 12:33PM
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maxxkatt
his is absolutely correct. I collect Morgans. Morgans were produced in huge numbers for political reasons. To keep the western politicians happy by keeping the silver prices artificially high by the government buying and minting more silver morgans than was needed. They were then stored at the mint and then at all the post offices because there was no demand for them. The sulfer in the bags caused the rainbow effect on morgans stored in contact with the sides of the bags.

The morgans are such beautiful coins because of toning and the fact that a huge number never got circulated.

Yeah Maxx, How about the Junk their passing off as dollar coins these days. They stain up sitting in your pocket. No one knows what they are when you use them. Crap.